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Archive for the ‘poetry’ Category

Think of something that scares you … or something that scared you when you were younger. (Sometimes ordinary things can seem very scary to someone small.)  Write a poem about it. Your poem should be no longer than 20 lines (shorter is fine!).

You must include an official cover sheet with your entry:

 

DOWNLOAD COVER SHEET HERE.

 

Your poem can be handwritten or typed.

The winning poem will be published on Alphabet Soup’s blog and the winner will receive one $30 bookstore voucher (posted to the address provided on the entry).

Entries (poem + 7 pieces of info) may be posted to Alphabet Soup, PO Box 3099, Broadway Nedlands WA 6009. (Entries must be posted in time to reach us by the closing date.)

OR

Entries (poem + 7 pieces of info) can be scanned and emailed as PDFs or .docx documents only to editor@alphabetsoup.net.au. Entries must be emailed in time to reach us by the closing date.

KEEP A COPY OF YOUR POEM because all entries and contact information will be destroyed after the competition’s closing date.

Some fine print:

  • The competition opens on Saturday 25 October 2014 and closes at 11.59pm (Perth time) on Tuesday 25 November 2014.
  • This competition is open to children aged 12 or younger on 25 November 2014.
  • This competition is open to residents of Australia only.
  • Immediate family members of Alphabet Soup’s paid employees are not eligible to enter this competition. (Children who contribute book reviews to Alphabet Soup’s website are not considered to be employees.)
  • To enter, you must write a poem about something that scares you, or something that scared you when you were younger. Your poem should be no longer than 20 lines (shorter is fine).
  • The poem must be all your own work. Poems that are copied from someone else is called plagiarism and will be disqualified.
  • Entries must include the the official cover sheet with its signed declaration (see above to download).
  • You may enter as many times as you wish, but each entry must include its own completed cover sheet (see above to download).
  • One winner will be chosen and will be notified by email or by telephone as per the info on your cover sheet.
  • The winner’s poem will be published on Alphabet Soup’s website and the winner will receive one $30 bookstore voucher — posted to you in the mail.
  • Entries (poem + cover sheet) may be posted to Alphabet Soup, PO Box 3099, Broadway Nedlands WA 6009. OR Entries (poem + cover sheet) can be scanned and emailed as PDFs or .docx documents to editor@alphabetsoup.net.au.

Privacy statement:

Alphabet Soup will never pass your information on to anyone else, except where required by law. All entries and personal information will be destroyed at the end of the competition.

Happy writing!

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Last year we held our first ever Poetry Festival, right here on the website. Hold onto your hats — it’s back! From 25 October when you visit our website you’ll find interviews, book reviews, tips and hints, interesting links, giveaways and of course … poems! (October is also our birthday month — what a fabulous month to celebrate poetry.)

And here’s a cheery poster to make it look official:

Poetry Festival

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This is a wonderful poem for reading out loud. ~ Rebecca


 

A SONG OF AUTUMN by Adam Lindsay Gordon

‘Where shall we go for our garlands glad
At the falling of the year,
When the burnt-up banks are yellow and sad,
When the boughs are yellow and sere?
Where are the old ones that once we had,
And where are the new ones near?
What shall we do for our garlands glad
At the falling of the year?’

‘Child! can I tell where the garlands go?
Can I say where the lost leaves veer
On the brown-burnt banks, when the wild winds blow,
When they drift through the dead-wood drear?
Girl! When the garlands of next year glow,
You may gather again, my dear—
But I go where the last year’s lost leaves go
At the falling of the year.’

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Our Village in the Sky by Janeen Brian, ill. Anne Spudvilas, ISBN 9781743318140, Allen and Unwin

Our Village in the Sky

 

REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 10, WA

A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

This is a book about kids living in a village in the Himalayan mountains. Our Village in the Sky is a book of poems and each poem talks about what the kids do during the day. They have to do chores like take care of the animals, wash clothes and scrub dishes, carry water from a water pipe, and more.

I found it interesting because I didn’t know much about this sort of life and it’s very different from the lives of Australian kids. The kids in this book don’t have the technology that we have, they spend their days doing chores so their families can live, and they make their own fun outdoors. My favourite pages are the ones about the children washing the dishes in summer and winter. But my favourite poem (as a poem) is the one about playing knucklebones.

The illustrations are realistic, serious pictures and they help you to see what the kids in the village are like. It helps you to understand the emotions in the poems.

The book also has a QR code — it takes you to a website with audio. This is especially good for young kids who can look at the pictures and listen to the poems be read to them.

This book is good for kids aged 6 to 12. I would recommend this book especially for grades 3 and 4 in their classrooms because it teaches you about life in another country while enjoying a good read at the same time. I give it 7.75/10 — it’s not the sort of book I would normally pick up but I was glad that I did read it.

Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of Bully on the Bus. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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George,

Who played with a Dangerous Toy and suffered a Catastrophe of considerable Dimensions

by Hilaire Belloc

When George’s Grandmamma was told
That George had been as good as gold,
She promised in the afternoon
To buy him an Immense BALLOON.
And so she did; but when it came,
It got into the candle flame,
And being of a dangerous sort
Exploded with a loud report!
The lights went out! The windows broke!
The room was filled with reeking smoke.
And in the darkness shrieks and yells
Were mingled with electric bells,
And falling masonry and groans,
And crunching, as of broken bones,
And dreadful shrieks, when, worst of all,
The house itself began to fall!
It tottered, shuddering to and fro,
Then crashed into the street below —
Which happened to be Savile Row.


When help arrived, among the dead
Were Cousin Mary, Little Fred,
The Footmen (both of them), the Groom,
The man that cleaned the Billiard-Room,
The Chaplain, and the Still-Room Maid.
And I am dreadfully afraid
That Monsieur Champignon, the Chef,
Will now be permanently deaf —
And both his aides are much the same;
While George, who was in part to blame,
Received, you will regret to hear,
A nasty lump behind the ear.

MORAL:
The moral is that little boys
Should not be given dangerous toys.

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It’s 21 March. Happy World Poetry Day!

Here’s one of our favourite poems:

THE TRIANTIWONTIGONGOLOPE by CJ Dennis

There's a very funny insect that you do not often spy,
And it isn't quite a spider, and it isn't quite a fly;
It is something like a beetle, and a little like a bee,
But nothing like a wooly grub that climbs upon a tree.
Its name is quite a hard one, but you'll learn it soon, I hope.
So try:
   Tri-
      Tri-anti-wonti-
         Triantiwontigongolope.

It lives on weeds and wattle-gum, and has a funny face;
Its appetite is hearty, and its manners a disgrace.
When first you come upon it, it will give you quite a scare,
But when you look for it again, you find it isn't there.
And unless you call it softly it will stay away and mope.
So try:
   Tri-
      Tri-anti-wonti-
         Triantiwontigongolope.

It trembles if you tickle it or tread upon its toes;
It is not an early riser, but it has a snubbish nose.
If you snear at it, or scold it, it will scuttle off in shame,
But it purrs and purrs quite proudly if you call it by its name,
And offer it some sandwiches of sealing-wax and soap.
So try:
   Tri-
      Tri-anti-wonti-
         Triantiwontigongolope.

But of course you haven't seen it; and I truthfully confess
That I haven't seen it either, and I don't know its address.
For there isn't such an insect, though there really might have been
If the trees and grass were purple, and the sky was bottle green.
It's just a little joke of mine, which you'll forgive, I hope.
Oh, try!
   Tri-
      Tri-anti-wonti-
         Triantiwontigongolope.

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The Trees Gifts
by Gillian, 11, USA
The
Tree’s gift
In the spring
Is to give us hope
That warmer days are
Coming.   The tree’s gift in
The summer is to give us a shady
Spot to sit and read a book.  The tree’s
Gift  in the fall is to give us vibrant  leaves
To jump in.   The tree’s gift in the winter is to
Let us admire its glittering ornaments and bright
Lights and to remind us that a new year is beginning.
A tree is
A gift all
Year long.

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