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Archive for the ‘book reviews’ Category

One Thousand TreesREVIEWED BY MATILDA, 11, WA

One Thousand Trees,
by Kyle Hughes-Odgers,
Fremantle Press, ISBN 9781925164725

Matilda received a review copy of this book from the publisher.

This is about living the city with polluted air, and how Frankie wishes there were trees. And then Frankie starts to imagine …

I’ve seen some of Kyle Hughes-Odgers artwork before, in Ten Tiny Things (written by Meg McKinlay), and also on walls and murals around Perth.

One Thousand Trees is reflective and shows you what happens in Frankie’s head as Frankie imagines a forest of trees. The story is told mostly through the illustrations, with not many words, and the words that are there are mostly prepositions. I like the shapes used for the trees and leaves, and the range of greens in the forest pages. (At the beginning of the book you see mostly greys and dark colours). The endpapers are good to look at — they change from the front of the book to the ones at the back of the book because of the story.

This picture book would suit children who live in the city, and kids who would like more trees in their environment. This book suits ages 4 to 8.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read Matilda’s other reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 11, WA

Firefly JulyFirefly July by Paul Janeczko (editor), ill. Melissa Sweet, Candlewick, ISBN 9780763648428

Matilda reviews her own copy of this book.

This is a book of VERY short poems all about different subjects.

I like the way the book progresses from spring, then through all the seasons, and ends at winter. My favourite poem was called ‘Window’ by Carl Sandburg. It’s only 3 lines long and it’s about the dark night having slashes of light. I really liked the choice of words and I’d like to read more by this poet.

Melissa Sweet’s illustration style definitely suits the poems. It’s interesting that in many of the illustrations she uses a sort of collage.

I recommend this book for ages 7+ and for people who like short poems!


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read Matilda’s other reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

 

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REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 11, WA

Amazing animals of Australia's national parks.Amazing Animals of Australia’s National Parks by Gina M Newton, National Library of Australia, ISBN 9780642278883

Matilda received a copy of this book from the publisher.

In this nonfiction book about Australian animals, there is one page for each animal with the headings:

What is it?

Where does it live? and

What is its life like?

I like the way the book is split up into the climates that the animals live in and the photographs are extremely professional. There is a ‘how to use this book’ page, which is really helpful for understanding certain symbols used in the book.

My favourite animal in this book was the Rufous Bettong (Aepyprymnus rufescens). This animal lives in woodlands, grasslands and forests.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves animals and wants to know more about Australian animals.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read Matilda’s other reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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To the lighthouse (book cover)REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 11, WA

To the Lighthouse by Cristy Burne,
ill. Amanda Burnett, 
Fremantle Press,
ISBN 9781925164619

Matilda received a review copy of this book from the publisher. 

Isaac and Emmy are two very different kids. They meet on Rottnest Island when their families are on holiday. Isaac is a shy, nervous boy, but Emmy is an extravagant daredevil. Emmy wants Isaac to begin a game of Dare — involving jumping into icy cold water, riding all the way to the lighthouse, and riding there at night by themselves. It’s dark, and it’s miles and miles away. Isaac’s Mum is very overprotective and she worries a lot. Luckily she doesn’t know they’re planning to go to the lighthouse at night …

It’s great to read a book that is set in WA, instead of the usual places in kids’ books (like England or Sydney). The illustrations are in black and white and appear about once in every chapter. They suit the story — they’re a bit quirky, like the characters in the book.

To the Lighthouse would be a good book for 7 to 10 year olds.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read Matilda’s other reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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Magic Fish Dreaming (book cover)REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 11, WA

Magic Fish Dreaming by June Perkins,
ill. Helene Magisson, Gumbootspearlz Press, ISBN 9780980731187

Matilda received a review copy of this book from the publisher.

This book has poems mostly based around nature and families in the environment in Queensland. My favourite poem in the collection is called ‘Rain song,’ about the rain moving across the land and affecting banana towns, cassowaries, and fields of sugar cane. I liked the sense of movement.

The illustrations are floaty and dreamy (not bright and shabam!) and they suit the style of the poems. I really like the illustration for the poem ‘Tawny’ — you can almost feel the fluffiness of the bird.

The book is divided into two sections — ‘Hunting for Giggle Poems’, and ‘Magic Fish Dreaming’. I didn’t think that the poems’ themes in each of these sections really matched their section titles and so I thought it would have been more effective just to have the poems all in together, without dividing the book into sections.

This is a poetry book with a really Australian feel to it. I would recommend these poems to children ages 7 to 10.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read all of Matilda’s reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

 

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Review of Family Day at the Perth Writers Festival 2017
by Matilda, 11, WA

On Sunday 26 February 2017 it was Family Day at the Perth Writers Festival at UWA. This year there were kid curators who were interviewing authors and illustrators at the Tropical Grove. I thought all the kids did a very good job and asked some great questions.

Mechanica by Lance Balchin.

Mechanica by Lance Balchin.

I also really liked the creativity stand run by Remida.

They provided heaps of interesting recycled materials so we could make robot-ish animals like the animals in the fantastic picture book Mechanica: A beginner’s field guide by Lance Balchin.

 

Here’s a photo of me with the robot caterpillar creature I made:

 

Robot caterpillar junk construction

 

There was also a giant board with wings set up by the children’s author and illustrator Kylie Howarth. You could decorate a feather and write on it what you would do if you had wings. This is how I decorated my feather:

Feather: if I had wings I would live with the birds.

When Kylie Howarth had glued your feather to the wings, then you could get your photo taken as if you had wings yourself:

Photo of Matilda with wings

 

My favourite session at the Tropical Grove was the drawing duel, when James Foley and Donovan Bixley drew robotic cats with some suggestions from the audience. My favourite session at Writers Central was the Pandemonium event, which included swing dancers and a band.

Overall, it was a really great day and I recommend everyone to go next year!

I give this event 5  stars.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. Her most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of  The Silver Donkey. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 12, WA

Ungifted by Gordon Korman

Ungifted by Gordon Korman, HarperCollins, ISBN 9780061742668

Joseph borrowed this book from his public library.

Gordon Korman wrote one of my favourite books (I Want to Go Home), and when I found this at the library I knew I wanted to read it. I thought it wasn’t as funny as some of Korman’s other books, but it had a great plot and kept me engaged.

Because of a mistake, Donovan is sent to an academy of selective distinction. He know’s he’s not gifted enough to be there but he decides to try to stay because he’s hiding out from the principal at his old school. (He skipped detention and managed to destroy the gym.)

All the kids at the academy suspect there was a mistake, so he has to do his best to blend in. Unfortunately he has a history of getting into trouble. I like how Korman links so many events in the story and keeps you guessing. Most readers aged 11+ would enjoy this humorous book. It involves lots of modern technology and the vocabulary suits advanced readers.


Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of The Island of Dr Libris. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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