Posted in poetry

Happy World Poetry Day!

In 1999, the United Nations declared March 21st as World Poetry Day. That’s today!

Here are some of our favourite Australian poets. On their websites you’ll find out a bit about them and quite often they have snippets of poetry to show you …
Elizabeth Honey
Janeen Brian
Kathryn Apel
Jackie Hosking
Lorraine Marwood
Sally Murphy
Sally Odgers
Sherryl Clark
Steven Herrick
Rebecca Newman
Teena Raffa-Mulligan
Stephen Whiteside
Claire Saxby

and a bonus site: Poetry Tag.

Today is a great day to share a poem with a friend, recite a poem to your family (or even better — with your family!), leave a poem lying around for someone to find or post a poem to someone who would enjoy it. Happy World Poetry Day!

What’s your favourite poem?

Posted in poetry, St Thomas' Primary School

Celebrating Australia — with poetry!

We recently interviewed Lorraine Marwood about writing Celebrating Australia: A Year in Poetry. (You can WIN your very own copy of the book, too!)

celebrating australia: a year in poetry (cover)

To launch the book, Lorraine spent last week visiting bookish blogs. She also asked each blog host to write a poem based on a poem from her collection.

Here is Lorraine’s poem:

SEASONS — AUTUMN

Autumn is loud crushing sounds
a foot scuffing rap-tapping shuffle.
One day a light dusting
of pathway obstruction
by week’s end a whole mound
of slip, slide, crunch, crackle.

Autumn is loud splashing colours
a yellow, rust, tangerine explosion.
One day a brightness in twos, threes
of pathway palette,
by week’s end a whole Monet mosaic
of buffs, shades, tints and silhouettes.

© Lorraine Marwood

Today the Year 5 students at St Thomas’ Primary School in Claremont (WA) take up the challenge. They worked in small groups to create their poems, either using the patterning of Lorraine’s poem (find the template here), or loosely inspired by the poem.

Sit back and enjoy a poetry feast!

Spring Poem
by Minerva and Abbey

Spring is the chirping of the bluebirds
the gentle buzzing of the bees,
one day lush blossoms bloom,
By week’s end parks full of floral outbreak
swish, sway, tweet, twirl

Spring is the soft pastel colours
peach, moss and baby blue
One day a lavender, honeysuckle eruption
blows over the garden’s greenery,
By week’s end the radiant colours have
created a glowing canvas

A Day of Winter
by Yasmin

Winter is twigs snapping,
The howling of the wind
And the roar of a blazing fire.

One day there is pelting rain,
Across the Australian plains.
The smell of the soft brown earth fills the air.

A pitter patter, a splish splash,
And a clash of the mighty thunder.

The crackling of the burning logs,
The sprinkle on the roof.
And the rage of the mighty storm.

A thick mist covers the land,
And onto the window panes,
As the smoke curls from the chimney tops.

A swish, a sway, a crackle,
And a snap, goes the icy bush.

Wing (winter and spring crossed)
By Sophie and Amy

Winter is a loud bang of lightning
A drip drop of rain from the pipes
One day a storm accrued
In the scrapers
A mud pit
Of slip slide crash!

A dark ash grey in the sky
A livid blue and a deep muddy brown
One day spring did come
In the big city
By week’s end a rainbow of colour
Of blues, greens and browns

Two Sides of Summer Poem!
By Jemima

Sizzling, crackling sausages on the barbecue,
Pop fizz the icy Coke explodes as it drizzles down the can,
One day in my backyard running under the sprinklers,
Splash splosh as I dive into the cold pool,
Mangoes, oranges, and watermelon as it drips down my face,
Split, chop, squeeze, chomp
Fresh fruit salad, enjoy it, it’s not a race!

The hot sand beneath my toes,
The mums having a cocktail under a shady umbrella,
One day dads fishing at the end of a jetty,
While the children are eating yummy strawberry ice-cream,
Bounce, crash, cheers, cling,
It’s the last day of summer!

Summer
By Joshua, Oscar, Euan and Patrick

Summer is a splash of joy, with the boom of the ball and the crack of the bat
of the back yard cricket game.
By the burning hot late night barbie.
A bright sunny yellow day.
A lush blue sky and the scorching hot sand.
Green grass swishing from side to side.
One day a boy named Kent decided to fly in the summer breeze, he jumped
and he flew like a boy in the hot summer wind.

Christmas in Australia
By Finn, Dylan and Gerry

Christmas in Australia is the crash of the ball hitting the wicket,
The sizzling of the sausages and
The crashing waves
Kookaburras are laughing and children are unwrapping presents
People eat turkey, lamb and pork at Christmas lunch
Christmas in Australia is full of blue sky and the yellow sun
Weeks after Christmas people are playing with their new toys,
and over on the other side of the world children are playing by the fire or in the snow
And back on Christmas Day people are swimming in the pool and having icy poles
Christmas in Australia is having lots of fun in the sun

Summer in Australia
By Ella, Emily and Charlotte

Summer is the sound of people bombing
into the pool,
the sizzle of the barbecue,
The crash of the waves,
Rays of sunlight burn your skin
On the beach playing cricket
Slurp, chirp, pop goes the weasel

Sunsets burn the sky with colour
a splash of colour on the ocean
The sea is emerald and sapphire blue,
sun shines on the Sydney Opera House

Things We Do in Summer
By Will and Tom

Waves crashing sun tanning
People surfing the world
Flip flops flapping sand crushing
Sun burning
Pool party’s water balloons
Pebble skimming and pineapple eating
Smoothie sipping water splashing
Movie watching boat riding

Fish catching
People diving
People baking under the sun
Ducks quacking
Seagulls squawking
Crabs crawling
Cuttlefish crunching
These are the things we do in summer

Sun rising
Sun setting
Going around the world
Sand castle building
Sausages sizzling
Sand boarding
Bicycle riding
These are the things we do in SUMMER!

This is the LAST STOP on Lorraine Marwood’s blog tour to launch Celebrating Australia: A Year in Verse. You can check out the rest of the tour (and the poems at each stop) here:

Blog tour dates and links:

2 March Jackie Hosking:  Topic: What makes a good poem ( according to LM)+ GIVEAWAY.

3 March Kathryn Apel:  Topic: Bringing a poetry collection together.

4 March Rebecca Newman: Topic: Research for poetry writers.

5 March Claire Saxby:  Topic: Inside this collection.

6 March Janeen Brian:  Topic: How you create for the creators: how you create ideas to excite children and adults to write poems of their own.

9 March Alphabet Soup:  Topic: Writing a class poem — the results! + GIVEAWAY. [You’re here!]

Posted in Book reviews by Joseph, Book reviews by kids, poetry

Book review: Celebrating Australia: A Year in Poetry

Celebrating Australia: A Year in Poetry by Lorraine Marwood, Walker Books Australia, ISBN 9781925081022

celebrating australia: a year in poetry (cover)

REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 11, WA

Joseph reviewed his own copy of this book.

I like poetry collections where the poems are connected by a theme — in this book the poems are all about key events in the year. I didn’t know of a few events before I read the poems (like Diwali — Festival of Light). Australia has lots of people from different countries and I like to learn about the different celebrations and important events. Chinese New Year, Australia Day, Christmas, Pancake Day (the start of Lent), Ramadan and heaps more.

My favourite poems in this collection:

‘A Recipe for Harmony Day’

At our school we always do a lot of activities for Harmony Day. At the school in the poem they do different activities with food so the kids in the class can try out foods from different countries. I like the way the poem sounds, and I like the humour in it (like the toasted marshmallows).

‘Graduation’

I’m thinking about graduation this year because I’m in year 6 and graduation is coming up for me at the end of the year. I really like the last three lines in this poem. And I like that the whole poem is like a little list.

‘Swimming Carnival’

I like the rhythm of it, and the repetition of the last line in each stanza makes me imagine I’m there with everyone being excited and preparing for the day. (The swimming carnival is a big deal).

There is a mix of simple drawings and photographs with the poems, they’re all black and white. Celebrating Australia: A Year in Poetry is fun to read aloud to other people and a good summary of a year. In your class you could probably read a poem aloud when an event comes up.

I would recommend this book to children aged 8 to 12.

© February 2015 “Review of Celebrating Australia: A Year in Poetry” by Joseph.
(https://soupblog.wordpress.com)

Alphabet Soup talked to Lorraine Marwood recently about writing Celebrating Australia: a Year in Poetry. You can read the interview here.

Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of The Billy That Died With Its Boots On. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

Posted in poetry, Soup Blog Poetry Festival

Kathryn Apel and her verse novel

bully on the bus
Bully on the Bus — a verse novel.

Today we have Kathryn Apel visiting us as part of the Alphabet Soup Poetry Festival. Kathryn writes fabulous poetry for kids. Some of you might remember Kathryn’s poems in Alphabet Soup (back when it was a print magazine) and her latest work is a brand new verse novel called Bully on the Bus. (You can read a review of Bully on the Bus in a previous blogpost — thanks to Souper reviewer Joseph, 10.)

We asked Kathryn if we could bombard her with questions about verse novels. (Luckily — she said yes!)

kat apel
Kathryn Apel dressed for the book launch.

AS: What IS a verse novel exactly?

KA: A verse novel is a story that is told in verse, either as a collection of individual poems that build to tell a story — or longer poems that stand as chapters in a larger story. Verse novels may be told in rhyme, or free verse.

AS: Can a verse novel rhyme?

KA: Oops. I answered that before I got to this question. I think, traditionally, verse novels did rhyme. But now there are lots that don’t. Mine don’t rhyme — but there are rhymes that sneak in, in places. I used to write lots of rhyming picture books, but I love that my verse novels don’t rhyme — so I can play with the words more … which includes rhyming play sometimes.
AS: What gave you the idea for Bully on the Bus?

KA: The idea came from an experience my boys had on their school bus … but as I was writing, I was  reminded me of my journey on the school bus as a child — with bullies. And suddenly I had more than enough ideas for Leroy’s story!

AS: Why did you choose to write it as a verse novel? (Why not a prose novel?)

KA: In fact, I did first write it as a prose novel — a chapter book for early readers. It was the Book Chook (Susan Stephenson) who helped me see that it really was a verse novel. Rewriting it as a verse novel was one of the most rewarding things I have done. I knew that this was the right format for Leroy’s story, because the words sang on the page.

AS: You write lots of poetry too. What’s different about writing a verse novel and writing a poem? 

KA: Great question. You’re really making me think with this …

A poem often captures a moment in time — or an event. A verse novel creates a bigger picture, and you become really involved with the characters — feel their emotions with them, and know how they’re going to respond. I think it’s the fact that the poems are a part of a whole that give them their strength … And because there are different emotions and experiences (and sometimes even different narrators — although not in Bully on the Bus, which is told through Leroy’s eyes) you can also explore different forms of poetry — different rhythms — throughout the book. Of course, because each poem is just one of many, the devices you employ as a writer in each particular poem are also dictated by the surrounding poems. Something that might be effective in a stand-alone poem may have already been used within the verse novel. So you have to  evaluate if it will still be effective if you do the same thing again — or if there’s another, better way of presenting it.

AS: Can you recommend other verse novels for primary school aged kids?

KA: This is one of the easiest questions I’ve ever had to answer! Australia has produced lots of beautiful verse novelists — and verse novels. It’s wonderful that publishers are producing them, and kids are reading them! The following verse novels are great reads for Primary students — although older readers (and adults) will also enjoy them. (That’s perhaps the best thing about verse novels. They’re so versatile!)

  • Sixth Grade Style Queen NOT! by Sheryl Clark
  • Ratswhiskers and Me, and Starjumps by Lorraine Marwood
  • Pearl Verses the World, and Toppling, and Roses are Blue by Sally Murphy
  • The Spangled Drongo, and Pookie Aleerah Is Not My Boyfriend by Stephen Herrick

AS: Where can we find your poems?

KA: Most of my poems have been published in magazines — so they’re not available online. But it’s something I’ve been meaning to fix, so in honour of this post, today I’m launching a page with poems for kids on my blog. You’ll find it at http://katswhiskers.wordpress.com/poetry-for-kids . Skip across to check it out sometime.

AS: Is there anything else we should know about Kathryn Apel?
KA: Every January I co-ordinate Month of Poetry, a family-friendly event that Alphabet Soup readers can participate in. The challenge is to write a poem a day for the month of January — but even if you only write a couple of poems, that’s still better writing none. 🙂 You can read more about the challenge on the Month of Poetry site — but be sure to get your parents permission and help to sign up.
Interview with Kathryn Apel © October 2014 Kathryn Apel & Rebecca Newman
http://alphabetsoup.net.au

Amazing sites

AUTHORS, ILLUSTRATORS, POETS & MORE!

AUTHORS

Aleesah Darlison
Andy Griffiths
Angela Sunde
Anna Branford
Briony Stewart
Carole Wilkinson
Catherine Carvell
Christina Booth
Christine Harris
Deborah Niland
Dianne Wolfer
Duncan Ball
Frances Watts
Frane Lessac
Freya Blackwood
Gabrielle Wang
Graeme Base
Gus Gordon
Hazel Edwards
James Foley
Janeen Brian
Jeni Mawter
Julia Lawrinson
Karen Collum
Kathryn Apel
Katrina Germein
Leanne Davidson
Libby Gleeson
Lorraine Marwood
Marcia Williams (UK)
Mark Greenwood
Meg McKinlay
Michael Rosen (UK)
Morris Gleitzman
Narelle Oliver
Nette Hilton
Peter Carnavas
Sally Murphy
Sandy Fussell
Sherryl Clark
Sheryl Gwyther
Stephen Michael King
Steven Herrick
Susan Stephenson
Tania McCartney
Wendy Orr

ILLUSTRATORS

Briony Stewart
Cassandra Allen
Christina Booth
Deborah Niland
Frane Lessac
Gabrielle Wang
Graeme Base
Gus Gordon
James Foley
Kerry Millard
Narelle Oliver
Peter Carnavas
Rebecca Cool
Stephen Michael King
Sarah Davis
Terry Denton

POETS

Duncan Ball
Janeen Brian
Kathryn Apel
Lorraine Marwood
Michael Rosen (UK)
Sally Murphy
Sherryl Clark
Steven Herrick
Rebecca Newman

CLASSROOM RESOURCES

Alphabet Soup (you’re here!)
Children’s Book Council of Australia
Children’s Book Council of Australia WA Branch
Kids Book Review
Literacy Lava
Michael Rosen (tips for using poetry in the classroom)
My Little Bookcase
Poetry Tag
Samurai Kids
Susan Stephenson
The Book Chook
My Little Bookcase
Australian Children’s Poetry

Posted in info, teachers' resources

Last chance to purchase back issues

After 25 December 2013 we will no longer be offering back issues of Alphabet Soup magazine for sale. So now is your LAST CHANCE to order back issues! You can order copies through our website.

Some of the earlier issues are now in short supply and issue 7 is almost sold out. If an issue is no longer available it will not appear as an option on the list to purchase. (We will do our best to remove sold-out issues from the list as soon as they are sold out!)

NB: There was no summer 2008 issue. 

Here is a snapshot of what was in each issue:

Issue 1 SPRING 2008 (limited supply)

issue 1

Theme: Alphabet Soup (a bit of everything!)

Author Q&A: Jackie French

Interest article: Firefighting

Poetry and stories by AB Paterson, Charlotte Clarence, Nardia Bordas

Folktale/fairytale: The Magic Porridge Pot

Issue 2 AUTUMN 2009 (limited supply)

issue 2

Theme: Water

Author Q&A: Duncan Ball

Interest article: Scuba diving

Poetry and stories by Brian Langley, Charlotte Clarence, Michele Purcell.

Foktale/fairytale: The Fisherman and His Wife

Writing tips: Keeping a journal

Issue 3 WINTER 2009 (limited supply)

Issue 3

Theme: Flight

Author Q&A: Jo Oliver

Interest Article: Air Traffic Control

Poetry and stories by CJ Dennis, Marie Clark, Michele Purcell

Greek Myth: Daedalus and Icarus

Writing tips: Describe it!

Issue 4 SPRING 2009 (limited supply)

"issue 4 cover"

Theme: Gardening

Author Q&A: Mark Greenwood

Interest Article: Home-grown vegies

Poetry and stories by Ann Ingalls, Brian Langley, Hazel Edwards, Michele Purcell

Folktale/Fairytale: Jack and the Beanstalk

Writing tips: Writers’ block

Issue 5 SUMMER 2009 (limited supply)

"Alphabet Soup issue 5 cover"

Theme: Space

Author Q&A: Christine Harris

Interest Article: Astronomy

Poetry and stories by Sally Murphy, Jackie Hosking, Paula Hayes and Mabel Kaplan

Folktale/Fairytale: The Red Riding Hood Rap

Writing tips: What does ‘write what you know’ mean?

Issue 6 AUTUMN 2010 (limited supply)

"Alphabet Soup issue 6 cover"

Theme: Outdoors

Illustrator Q&A: Chris Nixon

Interest Article: Rogaining

Poetry and stories by Jackie Hosking, Beverley Boorer, Michele Purcell, Selina Duke

Folktale/Fairytale: Hansel and Gretel

Writing tips: Getting to know your characters

Issue 7 WINTER 2010 (ONLY 3 copies remaining)

"Alphabet Soup issue 7 cover"

Theme: Ice

Author Q&A: Sandy Fussell

Interest Article: Art in the Ice Hotel

Poetry and stories by Karen Collum, Michele Purcell, Di Bates

Folktale/Fairytale: The Snow Maiden

Writing tips: Point of view

Issue 8 SPRING 2010 (limited supply)

"Issue 8 cover Alphabet Soup magazine"

Theme: Music

Interest article: Playing the viola

Poetry and stories by Jeni Mawter, Valerie Thomas, Lyn Oxley, Rebecca Newman

Folktale/fairytale: The Smell of Bread

Writing tips: How do I write a funny story?

Issue 9 SUMMER 2010 (limited supply)

"Alphabet Soup magazine issue 9 cover"

Theme: Wetlands

Author Q&A: Hazel Edwards

Interest article: Wetlands Care

Poetry and stories by Sally Murphy, Edel Wignell, Rebecca Newman, Aleesah Darlison

Folktale/Fairytale: A Needle and Thread

Writing tips: The writer as crocodile hunter

Issue 10 AUTUMN 2011 (in reasonable supply)

"Issue 10 cover Alphabet Soup"

Theme: Chemistry Fun

Author Q&A: Oliver Phommavanh

Interest article: International Year of Chemistry

Poetry and stories by John Malone, Nadine Cranenburgh, Michele Purcell, Kathryn Apel

Greek myth: The Golden Touch

Writing tips: Playing with words

Issue 11 WINTER 2011 (in reasonable supply)

Issue 11 cover, Alphabet Soup magazine

Theme: Things with Wings

Interest article: Bee keeping

Author Q&A: Wendy Orr

Poetry and stories by Edel Wignell, Jackie Hosking, Lorraine Marwood, Michele Purcell and Emma Cameron

Folktale/Fairytale: The Six Swans

Writing tips: Writing great dialogue

Issue 12 SPRING 2011 (in reasonable supply)

Alphabet Soup magazine, spring 2011

Theme: Sail Away!

Author Q&A: Briony Stewart

Interest article: Sailing

Poetry and stories by Pat (Tricia) Simmons, Edel Wignell, Michele Purcell, Susan Stephenson

Fable: The North Wind and the Sun

Writing tips: Finding the right title

Issue 13 SUMMER 2011 (in reasonable supply)

Issue 13 cover

Theme: Medieval

Author Q&A: Norman Jorgensen

Interest article: Fencing

Poetry and stories by Jackie Hosking, Marianne Musgrove, Michele Purcell, Tracey Slater

Legend: Robin Hood Meets Little John

Writing tips: Finding good names for your characters

Issue 14 AUTUMN 2012 (in reasonable supply)

Alphabet Soup issue 14 cover

Theme: Fun with paper

Writer Q&A: Lorraine Marwood

Interest Article: Making paper

Poetry and stories by Edel Wignell, Jackie Hosking, Rebecca Newman, Zoya Nojin

Fairytale/Folktale: Why Evergreen Trees Keep Their Leaves

Writing tips: Journalists’ skills

Issue 15 WINTER 2012 (in reasonable supply)

Alphabet Soup issue 15 cover

Theme: National Year of Reading!

Author-illustrator Q&A: Peter Carnavas

Interest Article: Judging Book Awards

Poetry and stories by Kathryn Apel, Sally Murphy, Lorraine Marwood, Michele Purcell, Susan Stephenson

Fairytale/Folktale: The Three Wishes

Writing tips: Beginnings — finding a hook

Issue 16 SPRING 2012 (in reasonable supply)

Alphabet Soup issue 16 (cover)

Theme: Champions

Author Q&A: Jen Banyard

Interest article: Behind the Scenes at Big Events

Poetry and stories by Marianne Musgrove, John Malone, Dianne Bates, Rebecca Newman

Fable: The Tortoise and the Hare

Writing tips: 10 Behaviours of a Champion Writer

Issue 17 SUMMER 2012 (in reasonable supply)

issue 17 (cover)

Theme: Come to the Fair!

Author-illustrator Q&A: Mark Wilson

Interest article: Juggling

Poetry, stories and a play by Jackie Hosking, Kathryn Apel, Michele Purcell, Susan Stephenson

Folktale/Fairytale: The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Writing tips: A lucky dip of prompts

Issue 18 AUTUMN 2013 (in healthy supply)

Autumn 2013 Alphabet Soup (cover)

Theme: Long, long ago

Author Q&A: Tania McCartney

Interest Article: School in 1941

Poetry and stories by Rebecca Newman, Tricia Simmons, Zoya Nojin

Folktale/Fairytale: The Little Red Hen

Writing tips: Writing perfect endings

Order back issues from our website

Posted in poetry

Recommended poetry books

We’ve had questions from readers asking where they can find good poetry books. A good place to start is your school library or your local library. (It’s free to join your local library and you can borrow quite a few books at a time.) If a book is out of print, you will often find it at your local library or you can try ordering the book in through a good bookshop.

Here are some poetry books that we love, in no particular order. (And there will be lots more in the poetry section of your library or bookshop!)

The ABC Book of Australian Poetry – a treasury of poems for young people compiled by Libby Hathorn, illustrated by Cassandra Allen.

"ABC Book of Australian poetry"

Big Book of Verse for Aussie Kids compiled by Jim Haynes

Big Book of Verse for Aussie Kids

By Jingo! By Janeen Brian

By jingo!

A Kick in the Head – an everyday guide to poetic forms, editor: Paul B. Janeczko, illustrated by Chris Raschka

A kick in the head

Don’t Put Mustard in the Custard by Michael Rosen, illustrated by Quentin Blake

Don't put mustard in the custard

Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake

Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes

Guinea Pig Town and other animal poems by Lorraine Marwood

guinea pig town

Honey Sandwich by Elizabeth Honey

honey sandwich

100 Australian Poems for children edited by Clare Scott-Mitchell & Kathlyn Griffith, illustrated by Gregory Rogers

100 Australian poems for children

Sea Dream: poems from under the waves, compiled by Nikki Siegen-Smith, illustrated by Joel Stewart

Sea Dream poems from under the waves

Well, that’s a few to get started with, though we love lots of others, too!

Do you have a favourite book of poetry?

Posted in poetry, Soup Blog Poetry Festival

Visiting poet – Janeen Brian

Janeen Brian

Today we have Janeen Brian visiting Soup Blog to talk about her poetry and poetry-writing. (Janeen also writes picture books, short stories, nonfiction and novels. She’s a busy writer!)

When did you first start writing poetry?

I can’t remember writing anything much at all as a child, so I’d guess I began writing poetry in my late twenties or early thirties.

What sort of poetry do you like writing best of all?

Both rhyming and free verse. I tend to use rhyme for more of my humorous pieces, but not exclusively. I love the word-manipulation, the struggle and the joy of creating rhyme. Free verse excites me too, but for a different reason. There, I aim to convey something to the reader by way of a new point-of view, a twist at the end, a particular rhythmic pattern, or a feeling. I love selecting the right word. It can take hours, or longer. But when it does — oh, what a feeling!

What sort of poetry do you like reading?

I love reading ballads, humorous, quirky, clever verses, verse novels, free verse and rhyming verse. I prefer reading children’s poetry because that’s the main area in which I write, but I also read adult poetry and have also written in that field.

Where can we find your poetry?

My poetry has been included in the following anthologies:

  • 100 Australian Poems for Children
  • There was a big fish (limericks)
  • Christmas Crackers
  • Fractured Fairytales and Ruptured Rhymes
  • Four and Twenty Lamingtons
  • Petrifying Poems
  • Stay Loose Mother Goose
  • Off the Planet
  • Vile Verse
  • Putrid Poems
  • Side by Side
  • Machino Supremo

(Tadpoles in the Torrens due for release September, 2013. Our Home is Dirt by Sea due for release 2014)

By jingo!Books of my own poetry:

  • By Jingo!
  • Silly Galah!
  • Nature’s Way A-Z of biodiversity.

(Our Village in the Sky due for release 2014)

Rhyming picture books:

  • I’m a dirty dinosaur
  • Meet Ned Kelly
  • I Spy Mum!
  • I Spy Dad!
  • The super parp-buster!
  • Shirl and the Wollomby Show
  • Columbia Sneezes.

Over 150 poems have been published nationally and internationally in the following magazines:

  • The School Magazine
  • the Victorian Education Magazines
  • Spider
  • Ladybird
  • Ladybug
  • Contagious.

Comma Dog © Janeen Brian

There’s a comma
of a dog
lying on the mat.
Dozing belly and
curl of tail
ears no longer
playtime exclamation marks
eyes closed as hyphens
and soft brackets of sighs
snuffling from
that comma of a dog
sleeping
in a circle
of sun.

Published in The School Magazine: Orbit. May 2012

How often do you write?

I write every day. It might be my diary, my ideas book, some research notes, a page of practice writing, a draft of a poem or story or rewriting earlier drafts of work.

Do you prefer to write with a pen and paper or straight onto the computer?

Note-taking, ideas gathering, early paragraphs or lines of poetry are mostly done by hand with pen and paper (an exercise book), but I gradually take the work onto the computer and work from there on.

What’s your number one tip for budding poets?

Choose a book of poetry. Write out several poems that you like and then work out how the poet has written them. Think and discover. And practise.

Janeen’s Poetry Prescription corner

IF YOU’RE HAVING A SHAMBLY DAY — read the following poem:

‘Cat Burial’ (from Note on the Door by Lorraine Marwood).

Some books by Janeen Brian

For even more about Janeen Brian and her books and poetry — visit her website!

Interview with Janeen Brian © 2013 Janeen Brian and Rebecca Newman https://soupblog.wordpress.com