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Archive for the ‘Book reviews by kids’ Category

Review of Family Day at the Perth Writers Festival 2017
by Matilda, 11, WA

On Sunday 26 February 2017 it was Family Day at the Perth Writers Festival at UWA. This year there were kid curators who were interviewing authors and illustrators at the Tropical Grove. I thought all the kids did a very good job and asked some great questions.

Mechanica by Lance Balchin.

Mechanica by Lance Balchin.

I also really liked the creativity stand run by Remida.

They provided heaps of interesting recycled materials so we could make robot-ish animals like the animals in the fantastic picture book Mechanica: A beginner’s field guide by Lance Balchin.

 

Here’s a photo of me with the robot caterpillar creature I made:

 

Robot caterpillar junk construction

 

There was also a giant board with wings set up by the children’s author and illustrator Kylie Howarth. You could decorate a feather and write on it what you would do if you had wings. This is how I decorated my feather:

Feather: if I had wings I would live with the birds.

When Kylie Howarth had glued your feather to the wings, then you could get your photo taken as if you had wings yourself:

Photo of Matilda with wings

 

My favourite session at the Tropical Grove was the drawing duel, when James Foley and Donovan Bixley drew robotic cats with some suggestions from the audience. My favourite session at Writers Central was the Pandemonium event, which included swing dancers and a band.

Overall, it was a really great day and I recommend everyone to go next year!

I give this event 5  stars.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. Her most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of  The Silver Donkey. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 12, WA

Ungifted by Gordon Korman

Ungifted by Gordon Korman, HarperCollins, ISBN 9780061742668

Joseph borrowed this book from his public library.

Gordon Korman wrote one of my favourite books (I Want to Go Home), and when I found this at the library I knew I wanted to read it. I thought it wasn’t as funny as some of Korman’s other books, but it had a great plot and kept me engaged.

Because of a mistake, Donovan is sent to an academy of selective distinction. He know’s he’s not gifted enough to be there but he decides to try to stay because he’s hiding out from the principal at his old school. (He skipped detention and managed to destroy the gym.)

All the kids at the academy suspect there was a mistake, so he has to do his best to blend in. Unfortunately he has a history of getting into trouble. I like how Korman links so many events in the story and keeps you guessing. Most readers aged 11+ would enjoy this humorous book. It involves lots of modern technology and the vocabulary suits advanced readers.


Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of The Island of Dr Libris. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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Today we have some excellent book reviews from the well-read year 2 students at St Thomas’ Primary School (Claremont, WA.) The class received a review copy of this picture book from the publishers.

REVIEWED BY ZARA, JACOB, LARA, JULIANA & BENEDICT

Fabish the horse that braved a bushfire

Fabish the horse that braved a bushfire by Neridah McMullin, ill. Andrew McLean, Allen and Unwin, ISBN 9781925266863

We like all the characters — Fabish (the horse), seven yearlings, the horse trainer and the race horses.

The story is about a horse who saves seven yearlings from a bushfire and about a farmer who was afraid the horses would die. Fabish the horse that braved a bush fire is a true story.

We definitely enjoyed the book. It was an exciting story that scared us and made us happy. We recommend this book to people who are interested in bushfires and adventures and horses. For all ages.


REVIEWED BY LUCA AND CAYDEN

This book is about a horse who saved the young horses from a bushfire. The wildfire reached the farm and the trainer told Fabrish to take the boys away from the bushfire. After the bushfire the farmer saw a rusty ute and drove off to the hill farm. Then the trainer heard rhythmic footsteps  and saw Fabish with the seven yearlings. The trainer and Fabish are the main characters. We liked the characters because Fabrish braved a bushfire and the trainer kept keeping his horses safe from the bushfire.


REVIEWED BY A SMALL LITERACY GROUP, YEAR 2

The characters were Fabish the horse, seven yearlings and the horse trainer. Fabish made us feel excited and brave, and we liked him because he saved the other horses. The trainer made us feel puffed out because he did so much work.

The book was about a bushfire on a farm that burned everything and a horse called Fabish (who saved seven yearlings by leading them away from the fire). The trainer went looking for Fabish after the fire and was very happy to find him with the seven yearlings. The book was fun to read, but it was a bit scary as well.

We liked the book because it was interesting and exciting and it was a true story. Our favourite parts were the bushfire and when Fabish and the yearlings came back. We learnt that you can die in a bushfire and that you should never go close to a bushfire.

We would recommend this book to Year 1 — Year 6 age students because it was a good adventure and had a good illustrator. The story also had lots of descriptive words, which we liked. We think people who like bushfires and horses would really enjoy this book a lot.


REVIEWED BY ALANA, RUBY AND GRACE

This story was a true story, because that was written in the blurb. The main characters are the farmer and Fabish the brave horse.

Fabish was our favourite character because he was brave and had a lovely heart and was beautiful-looking. He was a very smart horse because he led all the yearlings away from the bushfire.

The story starts off on a farm for race horses. Fabish was in charge of all the yearlings. Suddenly he was forced to lead the yearlings to safety because there was a frightening bushfire. The farmer stayed behind to protect the horses that were still in the stable.

We enjoyed the story because the author used interesting words! Neridah McMullin described the bushfire with good adjectives to show what it would feel like to be stuck in a bushfire.


REVIEWED BY A SMALL LITERACY GROUP, YEAR 2

This book is about a horse called Fabish and other horses caught in a bushfire.

There are two main characters in this story — Fabish and the farmer. Fabish is a big white horse. He is the farmer’s favourite horse and he is very brave. The farmer loved Fabish and he was a good farmer who looked after lots of horses. He trained the horses to race. He worried about Fabish.

It was very hot and a bushfire started. The trainer opened the gate and told Fabish to save the seven yearlings. Fabish ran off and the trainer was worried that he had been killed in the fire.

We liked the story because the bushfire was exciting but scary. Fabish was a lucky and brave horse. The story has lots of details and description.

We would recommend this book to all children and adults because it is a beautiful picture book.

Fabish the horse that braved a bushfire.


If you’d like to read more from St Thomas’ Primary students, you can click on ‘St Thomas Primary’ in the grey categories box in the right column of this blog. To send us YOUR book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY LILLIANNA, 9, VIC

Thunderstorm dancing

Thunderstorm Dancing by Katrina Germein, illustrated by Judy Watson, Allen and Unwin, ISBN 9781743314593

Lillianna borrowed a copy of this book from her school library.

Thunderstorm dancing is a story that you won’t see every day. It has lots of clues that keep it fascinating.

A family is at the beach and there’s a storm coming, but is it really a storm after all?

The book has very detailed illustrations and the pictures have been created with great care and respect.

Each page is about a different character.

I recommend Thunderstorm Dancing for 3–9 year olds because there are more pictures than words.

I give Thunderstorm Dancing a 5-star rating.


This is Lillianna’s first book review for Alphabet Soup. If you’d like to read more book reviews by Oxley Christian College students, you can click on ‘Oxley Christian College’ in the grey categories box in the right column of this blog. To send us YOUR book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 12, WA

The Island of Dr Libris

The Island of Dr Libris by Chris Grabenstein, Random House Children’s Books, ISBN 9780553538434

Joseph borrowed this book from his public library.

I really enjoyed Escape from Mr Lemoncello’s Library (another book by the same author) so I was excited to find this book at the library. Although I enjoyed it, it wasn’t as good as Escape from Mr Lemoncello’s Library, which was my favourite book this year.

In this book: In the holidays Billy has to go to a boring cabin with his mum instead of staying at the apartment with his dad. Billy’s mum rented the cabin from Dr Libris, her university professor, for a very good price and she’s going to sit and work on her dissertation all holidays. Billy has to entertain himself, so when he smashes his iPhone and there is no other technology he has to amuse himself by reading books from Dr Libris’ giant collection. But as he starts reading he can hear strange sounds coming from the island in the middle of the lake. It’s almost as if the stories he’s reading are coming to life. Together with Walter — a boy he met around the cabins — he goes to investigate what’s happening on the island.

This is a fantasy adventure I would recommended for ages 10+ because it has quite a lot going on in the book and you need to be able to follow it. You’ll appreciate it best if you already know about well-known characters from classic literature like Robin Hood, Tom Sawyer and others.


Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of Escape from Mr Lemoncello’s Library. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 12, WA

ESCAPE FROM MR LEMONCELLO'S LIBRARY by Chris Grabenstein

Escape from Mr Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Grabenstein, Random House Australia, ISBN 9780857988232

Joseph borrowed this book from his school library.

Mr Lemoncello is the greatest game-maker that has ever been. When Kyle learns that his public library has been bought and redesigned by Mr Lemoncello he is desperate to win a place on the Library Lock-in this Friday. Then the children who win a place at the Lock-in discover the rules have changed. They will be racing against the clock to escape from Mr Lemoncello’s library and there will only be one winner with a cool prize.

The redesigned library is now full of awesome stuff like holograms, a domed roof covered in electronic screens, and interactive electronic ‘games’. (It makes me jealous — that library is so much better than any libraries I know.)

The story is well-written and you have to think of two or more paths for a puzzle to make all those parts slide together. I’ve reread this book lots of times since I first read it a month ago. This book hooks you from the start and keeps you wondering. It reminded me of the Encyclopedia Brown stories in parts because it gave you the opportunity to solve the clues yourself as you read along. There are also references to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and a range of other classic and modern books and authors.

This wacky, intriguing read is my favourite book this year. I can recommend it for readers 10+ (and advanced readers of 9+) because it makes the book more enjoyable if you understand the references and literary in-jokes.


Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of Wonder. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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REVIEWED BY BREANNA, 8, VIC

Frog Finds a Place

Frog Finds a Place by Sally Morgan and Ezekiel Kwaymullina, ill. Dub Leffler, Omnibus Books, ISBN 9781742990231

Breanna read a copy of this book in her school library.

Frog wants to fly to the moon and stars to make friends.

One night Frog has a dream, He is with the moon and stars up in the sky, playing games telling jokes, until Old Crow comes along and ‘caws’ at Frog. Frog wakes up from his dream just as Old Crow flies away into the darkness.

Spider thinks that Frog could make a web to reach into space. Possum suggests that Frog could swing from a high vine in the woods. Crow reckons that Frog needs some feathers to fly high into space. Will Frog ever get to the moon and stars?

This book is about a frog who has a dream that he can’t achieve on his own. However, when he finds help, his hope grows like ours does when we have faith in an opportunity to try and achieve.


This is Breanna’s first book review for Alphabet Soup. If you’d like to read more book reviews by Oxley Christian College students, you can click on ‘Oxley Christian College’ in the grey categories box in the right column of this blog. To send us YOUR book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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