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Archive for the ‘poetry’ Category

Nightmares
by Jin Xiang, 10, VIC

 

Nightmares (artwork by Jin Xiang)

This will not be fun,
As your deepest fears,
Each and every one,
Brings out more tears.

They have come, they are here,
To haunt your life,
To grow your fear,
Cutting you like a knife.

Tearing you apart,
Your life has been shattered,
Breaking your heart,
Until nothing else mattered.

Suddenly you hear it, you do,
That ringing beep,
That saves you,
That wakes you from your sleep.


We’ve published Jin Xiang at Alphabet Soup previously — you can see her work here.  If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

 

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Photo of dancers from pexels.com

I LOVE TO DANCE
by Anishka, 7, QLD

I love to dance.
The music gets me on my feet,
I follow the music with fifteen merry steps.

The melody is sweeter than the butterfly,
That’s flapping its wings,
It takes me round and round being careful,
Not to get dizzy and fall.

But I have fun,
Felt just like an angel.
Off I go, twirling and spinning,
Just like tingling, as I love dancing.


Anishka has been published at Alphabet Soup many times — you can read all her earlier work here.

If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!

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THE JACARANDAS
by Sophie, 9, QLD

It seems to be the season where all the jacarandas fall
I see jacarandas on the ground, not just one, but all

I see the beautiful colours so purple so bright
It is even better than the moon at night

Wow! I’m so lucky to see these flowers
I could stand here and look at them for hours


This is Sophie’s first poem published with Alphabet Soup. If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!

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TWISTED Ps
by Zara, 8, VIC

The painful panda picked up a peaceful peach playing a piano.
Pink pigs prefer pineapples.
Purple peacocks don’t like pasta or prawns.
Penelope Parker has a pet penguin and pet parrots.
The police pointed to a polar bear poking a poisonous pilot.


This is Zara’s first poem published with Alphabet Soup. If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!

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PASS THE BOOK BATON

Today we introduce a new Friday feature — Alphabet Soup will be featuring a book creator every Friday who will answer one question. And then they will ask one question of the next Friday’s visitor. (It’s kind of like a book relay in slow motion.)

We’re thrilled to have Kathryn Apel visiting for our first ever Pass the Book Baton! Kathryn writes poetry, picture books, novels and verse novels. You might know some of her books from the photo below.

 

Kathryn starts our interview series, so we asked Joseph to give her an interview question. (Joseph is 12, and is one of our Top Reads team members. He has reviewed Kathryn’s verse novels for Alphabet Soup.)

Q. I really enjoyed Bully on the Bus and On Track, both verse novels. But you’ve written other books, too. Why did you decide to write those two books as verse novels?

A. Verse novels very often deal with issues that have a lot of heart. They have humour and laughter too, but I think the raw emotions are key. I really wanted to try writing a verse novel, and chose a topic that would interest sporty kids. My first attempt was a verse novel about training, with threads of sibling rivalry and self-doubt. But I didn’t get far before I panicked. In fact, I’d only written 139 words! (I think I was feeling that self-doubt!)

Bully on the busI put it away to think about (or forget about) and went back to polishing a manuscript about bullying. It was a chapter book I’d written for younger readers. But then I had feedback from a critique-buddy, and realised the chapter book I was writing was really the verse novel I wanted to write. I sat down straight away, and started working Bully on the Bus into a verse novel. At first, I thought I’d flick between verse and prose (poetry and paragraphs) … but once I started, the prose sounded clunky and heavy, whereas the verse was lighter and so much better. It all needed to be written in verse.

Bully on the Bus was accepted … and published … and I was still writing that verse novel about training; On Track. I thought it was going to tell Toby’s story. I didn’t realise that his older brother Shaun also had a story to tell. Being a verse novel made it easier to feel the emotions from both sides — and to switch between the two brothers.

On track (cover)My heart soars when I’m writing verse novels. Maybe because I’m writing about topics that are important? That can make a difference in someone’s life? Or maybe because they’re just so very beautiful to write … and read. Though I do often get teary when writing them … and reading them — even my own. It’s also fun to slip in short and snappy little jokes, and the verse novel format enables that.

Writing a novel — without the verse — scares me. It seems so enormous! But writing a verse novel, I can write short, complete pieces, individual poems that slowly, carefully, bit by bit, build to tell the story.

I remember when you reviewed Bully on the Bus, Joseph, you said you would like to read more verse novels and maybe write one, too. I’m wondering how you’ve got on with that. Don’t worry if you haven’t written much yet — ideas grow once you’ve made the start.


Steve goes to carnivalAnd now Kathryn can pass the book baton to our next visitor. (Actually two visitors at once — Joshua Button and Robyn Wells who are the author-illustrators behind Steve Goes to Carnival.)

My question for Joshua Button & Robyn Wells:   I read that you collaborate for hours over the kitchen table. Can you describe your process — and how you came to form this wonderful working partnership?


Visit Kathryn Apel’s website: https://katswhiskers.wordpress.com/ to find out more about her and her books. (You can also read Joseph’s reviews of her verse novels Bully on the Bus and On Track here on Alphabet Soup.)

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Every Friday Alphabet Soup will feature an interview with a children’s book creator — writers, illustrators and writer-illustrators. Our Friday guest will answer a question and then ask one question of the next writer or illustrator. (It’s a bit like running a book relay in slow motion.)

We’re calling it:

PASS THE BOOK BATON

Be sure to check in on Fridays. Our first writer will be setting off with the baton tomorrow morning.  See you then!

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Snowing Everywhere

by Anishka, 6, QLD

The snow is white,
the air is quiet.
The snowflakes are dazzling,
the snowman is singing.
The snow covers paths, streams, parks and markets
like a blanket.
The sun comes up to take winter,
the snowman melted and became water.


Anishka has been published on Alphabet Soup previously — you can read her earlier work here and here.

If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!

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