Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: Seashell

SEASHELL
by Anishka, 8, QLD

I saw a seashell,
To mum and dad, I might tell,
No way, I’ll keep it a secret,
Anyway, we just met.

Inside it wiggles a bit,
Like someone’s head invaded with nits.
It squirms and wiggles,
Zig-zagging like scribbles.
I wonder what is inside,
Maybe something washed in through the tide.

It could be treasure or gold,
Or a tent that can fold.
I’m getting silly, those things don’t move,
They don`t scamper on my roof.

An animal peeps out of the shell,
And climbs out then it fell!
I play with it all day long,
Keeping the secret all day long,

Saying goodbye, off I run,
Today is already done!


Anishka is a regular contributor to Alphabet Soup — you can read all her earlier work here.

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: Friendship Tree

FRIENDSHIP TREE
by Gabriel, 7, NSW

A hand holding two green seeds. Photo courtesy of pexels.comDan found a seed and planted it in his family garden.

He wondered to himself, “What type of seed is it? An acorn or a pineapple or a …”

Every day, he watered the seed. He waited and waited. Every day, he checked the seed to see if it was growing.

One day, he saw a tiny green point. Dan still watered the plant as he did every day.

Ten days later, it was one metre tall. Every day, it grew ten centimetres taller which was very quick for a plant.

He saw some apples on it the same day, so he thought it was an apple tree.

Thirty days later it was three metres tall! He said to himself, “This tree is growing quick.” Then he saw it was growing apples, mangoes and acorns which were all fresh.

Another month later it was five metres tall! And this time it was growing five different types of fruit. He thought, “I could pick some fruit and make a fruit salad.” When he picked the fruit in the same place, the fruit grew back!

When he came indoors it was time for afternoon tea. He gave his mum some of the fruit and said, “This is some fruit that I picked off my tree. This fruit is for a fruit salad for afternoon tea.”

Then he went to set the table for afternoon tea. He thought afternoon tea will be tasty with the fruit salad and with the little muffins and cupcakes.  When he tasted the fruit salad, it was very sweet, but not too sweet.

When Dan had finished afternoon tea, he went to play fetch with his dog, Tom.

While Tom was coming back, he got out his note book and wrote:

Plan: I want to build a treehouse in my tree, enjoy the fruit in the tree, climb to the very top of the tree, have picnics under the tree and a swing.

Dan wanted a friend to play with, but most kids went to school.

Five days later, Dan started to build his new tree-house. When he was nailing his third piece of wood, he broke a branch off and it fell into Sam’s farm. (Sam was the neighbour.) He was resting out in his garden when he saw that some of his strawberry plants were crushed.

Then Sam told Dan, “I will tell your Mum and Dad to chop down that tree.” After Dan heard this, he was sad.

Sam had a little girl and her name was Sally. When Sam went to get the garden hose to water the farm, Sally came out. When Sally saw the treehouse that Dan was making, she wanted to be friends with Dan so that Dan would maybe let her go into the treehouse.

Sally went to Dan’s garden and then said, “Could you and me be friends?”

Dan answered, “Yes, we can be friends.”

Sally said, “Could I help you in building the treehouse?”

“OK,” said Dan.

So Sally and Dan set to work. CRASH! BANG! CRASH! BANG! The sound of the nailing was so loud that Sam came out and shouted, “Stop that noise!”

Then he saw it was Dan and Sally that were making the noise. And he saw their happy faces. He thought, “I should not tell Dan’s parents to chop down that tree. Or else their happy faces will became sad faces and now Sally has got a friend and I don’t want Dan to be sad because he might not want to be Sally’s friend.”

In the end, Dan became Sally’s best friend. And together the parents and children happily built the treehouse and the swing.


Gabriel is a regular contributer to Alphabet Soup. You can read some of his earlier work here. If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!

Posted in Recommended reading, Top Reads

TOP READS: June 2018

It’s chilly at Alphabet Soup — if it’s cold where you are, we hope you have a cosy corner (or a patch of sunshine) and stack of good books …

It’s the last day of the month, and you know what that means? More booky recommendations from our Top Reads team!* Add these titles to your ‘must read’ lists:

You’ll find a recommended list from our Top Reads Team on the last day of every month (February to November). If you’d like even more recommendations, browse all through all our Top Reads ever!

*All our Top Readers are kids aged 13 and under. No grownups allowed!

Posted in Recommended reading, Top Reads

TOP READS: May 2018

It’s the last day of May — and that means it’s time for our Top Reads team* to stop by with this month’s book recommendations. If you’re looking for something to read, check out these great books:

You’ll find a recommended list from our Top Reads Team on the last day of every month (February to November). If you’d like even more recommendations, browse all through all our Top Reads ever!

*All our Top Readers are kids aged 13 and under. No grownups allowed!

Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: The Mosquito

THE MOSQUITO
by Emma, 12, SA

Girl with a shocked look on her face and brown hair. Photo by pexels.com

Floating in the wind
As graceful as a leaf
Yet as direct as a fly
I soar and I dip
I twirl and I float
I see and I dive
I have ears and I have eyes
Be aware of my presence.

Can you see me?

I can see you
In the car, on a bench
Or maybe in your slumber
Can you hear me?
Can you feel my bite?
The cry of an itch
Piercing through your skin
I am stealthy
Attacking the oblivious
Stabbing you from behind
Like a warrior on a hunt

I like to annoy
I like to cause trouble
My small frame allows me
To attack from every direction
Creeping through the cracks and the gaps you forgot to fill
Perhaps I am smarter than you think
I can see past your mirage
Your illusion like hope
That I won’t approach
Oh you have got it all wrong
But you will have to pay

You can clap or slap
Or bring me to a light
But you shall never catch me,
A small warrior in a fight
Even out of the heat,
Or the summer season
My bite will still find you
Will sink into your skin
Will bring tears to the eye
As you try to stop the feeling
Of the tingle, of the itch
Crawling across your skin
Like a ripple in the ocean


This is Emma’s first poem for Alphabet Soup. To send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

Posted in book reviews, Book reviews by kids, Book reviews by Matilda

Book review: The Endsister

REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 12, WA

The Endsister by Penni Russon

The Endsister by Penni Russon, A&U Children’s,
ISBN 9781741750652

Matilda reviewed her own copy of this book.

The Outhwaite family is a carefree Australian family but when their father inherits a huge house over in London, the whole family moves. Clancy, the twins, and even Else have to settle into their new lives, and Sibbi knows what an Endsister is …

I really enjoyed The Endsister. It had wonderful twists, and I really liked how small things turned out to be important. The characters were really relatable and lovable, especially Clancy’s new best friend, Pippa.

I would recommend this story for readers 10 years and older who like spooky books, haunted houses, and books about families.


Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. You can read Matilda’s other reviews here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: What God has done

Orange green and tan bird on spring branch. Photo from pexels.com

WHAT GOD HAS DONE
by Joshua, 9, NSW

Wake up!
Hear the birds from the far north chirping,
Watch the trees’ new green banners opening.
The buzzing bees,
Coming in and out from their trees.
All flowers, all blooming,
Meadows of green grass are the best spots to be relaxing.
When the gentle wind plays a song,
All the tall trees sing along.
With the flowers,
(Like tulips and roses),
All spring really explodes its colours.
Spring is twinkling,
Her beauty is sparkling.
Come along, rejoicing,
With all the nature singing.
Don’t fear,
For the fun is coming near!
Quickly come to listen and hear,
Oh, thank God for what he has done this year.


You can read one of Joshua’s earlier stories here.  If YOU would like to send us a story, drawing, poem, or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy writing!