Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: A sinkhole in the park

A SINKHOLE IN THE PARK
by Lewis, 10, WA

I went for a drive to the park one day,
and what do you think I saw?
A bunch of people screaming
and a sinkhole in the floor!

I stopped the car and looked around
until I couldn’t see.
(A bunch of people in my way
and one called Sylus Lee.)

I asked him what happened
and he said a strong ape jumped,
jumped and landed with a crash!
And now people are pumped.


Read Lewis’s earlier work here. To send us YOUR book review, poem, story or artwork: check out our submission guidelines

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Diary of a Gramophone

DIARY OF A GRAMOPHONE
by Elizabeth, 6, NSW

Gramophone photo by Skitterphoto at pexels.comTom carried me like a baby. He wiped my big pipe mouth. I felt clean.
Then Tom put the record on to my tummy. He spun my hand really fast. Then the family was happy when I was singing. They sang a song with me. I was delighted. It was lovely.

Read other work from Elizabeth hereTo send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!
Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in Action: Ode to Lego

ODE TO LEGO
by Lewis, 10, WA

Child building something by hand. Photo from pexels.com Oh, Lego! I have love and happiness
for thee, and I would be bored without.
I am only disappointed when I hear a crash!
And I am always satisfied when I hear a click.

Getting my first set is still in my mind!
It was so small, yet so big and great for thyself.
I am creative and happy when I touch you.
I save up so much to buy you all.

Lego, you’re old and wonderful,
I am grateful and excited when I open a set!
Lego, you are my memory of yesterday,
And I will never forget your darn good beauty!

Thy Lego has such cool features,
I feel like I’m in the future!
When I turn the light on I imagine you there.
I will never forget you and your beauty!


This is Lewis’s first poem for Alphabet Soup. To send us YOUR book review, poem, story or artwork: check out our submission guidelines

Posted in Bowral Public School, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Toby

TOBY
by Meg, Year 5/6, Bowral Public School, NSW

It was such a miserable day. If you add up all of the miserableness in the world and then times it by the weight of the world, the day was still more miserable. It was rainy, but at the same time, it was hot and humid so it was worse being inside than out. Toby was trapped inside The Great Tree of Woof. He had all of his other doggy friends, of course, but Toby had cabin fever and he wanted to go outside, desperately.

The problem was though, The Great Tree of Woof was being rather inconvenient. It had this terrible habit of making all of the doors too small when it was raining. Yes, to you and me this seems like a good idea because if all of those dogs went outside into the rain then they would come back muddy and disgusting. But for Toby, it was unbearable.

Toby was starting to hallucinate. He was certain that he saw Felix, the smallest dog at The Great Tree of Woof, waltzing upside down on the ceiling. This was getting ridiculous. Toby HAD to get out.

Dog snout at night. photo courtesy pexels.comToby had to just make do for now and only stick out his snout. It was better than nothing.

Rain splattered down on Toby’s nose. It was nice and refreshing. The memories of when he was a puppy came back to him. How he could sneak out because he was so small. Toby wished that he was still that small. The rain drops became bigger and Toby started to feel drowsy.

As he lay down thunder rumbled up ahead. He wasn’t going to be able to sleep for long. When the thunder started he, being the oldest and wisest dog there, had to calm all of the puppies down.

Toby wriggled to get comfy and drifted off to sleep.


We will be sharing writing from students at Bowral Public School over the next few days. If you’d like to send us YOUR book review, story, poem or artwork, check out our submission guidelines

Posted in Bowral Public School, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Life of a Rotten Potato

LIFE OF A ROTTEN POTATO
by Angus, 10, Bowral Public School

Potatoes dug up from the garden. Image courtesy of pexels.comHello there, I’m a potato. Today I’m going to tell you how the life of a rotten potato works. At the start of my life I was stuck under this icky brown stuff, I was under there for weeks until a human finally pulled me out. That was the first time I met my family. My brother’s name was Spud, my mum’s name was Beryl and my dad’s name was Mark. My brother always teased me and said that I was rotten. I felt left out all the time because all my friends ditched me when they found out I was rotten. I asked Mum and Dad if I was rotten. They said I wasn’t, but I knew they were saying that to be nice.

The next stage of my life was being cleaned. It was one of the most horrible things that had happened to me ever. My second cousin drowned. His name was Fred, it was really quite sad. When I had to be washed I was exited I thought the mould and stuff would come off but it didn’t, it was horrible.

The third stage was being cut up, this was usually the end of a potato’s life — but I was rotten so they didn’t cut me up into little bits, they just threw me in the trash. I was super sad for the next few days because my mum, dad and brother got cooked and eaten. I was lonely in the garbage. The only thing to talk to was a mouldy banana named Rick. He said the same sort of thing happened to his family except they just got eaten not cooked. The next day the evil humans put all the garbage into one big metal bin with all the dead foods that nobody had eaten.

There was a mandarin that nobody had eaten. I said he was lucky he was alive, but then he said he was inhabited by worms. Sadly Rick the banana didn’t make it, he fell out of the bin and got stepped on and he got splattered everywhere it was disgusting. When we were first put into the metal bin we got put on a truck and got driven to a place called the tip. There were so many other foods that were still alive. My best friend became a brussels sprout named Rick, just like my friend Rick the banana but we do not speak of Rick the banana any more. After six months in the tip at night, I was laying looking up at the stars thinking about my family and friends, how they died. I thought that I should stop thinking about them and think about how I made new friends and how I’m still alive today instead of thinking about all the bad things in life like being rotten. That night I went to sleep a happy potato and I lived out the rest of my life as one. And that is the life of a rotten potato.


We will be sharing writing from students at Bowral Public School over the next few days. If you’d like to send us YOUR book review, story, poem or artwork, check out our submission guidelines

Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Back to School

BACK TO SCHOOL
by Liora, 9, Manhattan, USA

Close up on an open notebook with words highlighted. Photo courtesy of pexels.com

Oh no, the summer is over, it’s time to go back to our schools
There is so much homework and so many rules!

You have to go shopping for school supplies
When you’d rather be eating a hamburger and fries

You’ll have PE, reading, science, math and more
And you mumble to yourself that this is quite a bore

But at least, you’ll see all your friends again
And for that I would give away my lucky pen.


You can read more of Liora’s poetry hereTo send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines.

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young writers in Action: Stars in the Sky

STARS IN THE SKY

by Gabriella, 9, Virginia USA

A hand with palm up towards a crescent moon and stars in a pale evening sky. Photo courtesy of pexels.comStars shining,
brightly,
light up the night, like
little lanterns.
.
Stars shining at night,
stars shining in space,
stars shining all day, but only
to see at night.
.
Red, blue, yellowish white,
all of these stars I like.
Spring is when I go outside,
stare and find the constellations that
light up the deep blue sky.
.
Little Dipper,
Big Dipper,
Orion’s Belt,
happy memories light up the night.
.
Stars, constellations,
little lanterns,
shine brightly,
never fading away.
.
When Zeus placed them in the sky, they were meant to stay.
.
Stars are lanterns.
Stars are motorcycles
riding slowly across the deep blue sky.
.
Every time a star dies,
a new one is born.
.
Stars are powerful.
We are powerful.
.
We are stars,
shining brightly, all over the deep, blue sky.
We are the little lanterns lighting up the sky.
We are the motorcycles riding across the sky
at night.
.
All stars are variable,
we are all variable.
We can be ourselves, able to change, able to live our own lives,
capable.
.
So, be you.
Be your own star.
Be your own little lantern.
Be your own motorcycle.
Be your own happy light.
Be the star you were
meant to be.

This is Gabriella’s first poem published by Alphabet Soup. To send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines.