Posted in Bowral Public School, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Life of a Rotten Potato

LIFE OF A ROTTEN POTATO
by Angus, 10, Bowral Public School

Potatoes dug up from the garden. Image courtesy of pexels.comHello there, I’m a potato. Today I’m going to tell you how the life of a rotten potato works. At the start of my life I was stuck under this icky brown stuff, I was under there for weeks until a human finally pulled me out. That was the first time I met my family. My brother’s name was Spud, my mum’s name was Beryl and my dad’s name was Mark. My brother always teased me and said that I was rotten. I felt left out all the time because all my friends ditched me when they found out I was rotten. I asked Mum and Dad if I was rotten. They said I wasn’t, but I knew they were saying that to be nice.

The next stage of my life was being cleaned. It was one of the most horrible things that had happened to me ever. My second cousin drowned. His name was Fred, it was really quite sad. When I had to be washed I was exited I thought the mould and stuff would come off but it didn’t, it was horrible.

The third stage was being cut up, this was usually the end of a potato’s life — but I was rotten so they didn’t cut me up into little bits, they just threw me in the trash. I was super sad for the next few days because my mum, dad and brother got cooked and eaten. I was lonely in the garbage. The only thing to talk to was a mouldy banana named Rick. He said the same sort of thing happened to his family except they just got eaten not cooked. The next day the evil humans put all the garbage into one big metal bin with all the dead foods that nobody had eaten.

There was a mandarin that nobody had eaten. I said he was lucky he was alive, but then he said he was inhabited by worms. Sadly Rick the banana didn’t make it, he fell out of the bin and got stepped on and he got splattered everywhere it was disgusting. When we were first put into the metal bin we got put on a truck and got driven to a place called the tip. There were so many other foods that were still alive. My best friend became a brussels sprout named Rick, just like my friend Rick the banana but we do not speak of Rick the banana any more. After six months in the tip at night, I was laying looking up at the stars thinking about my family and friends, how they died. I thought that I should stop thinking about them and think about how I made new friends and how I’m still alive today instead of thinking about all the bad things in life like being rotten. That night I went to sleep a happy potato and I lived out the rest of my life as one. And that is the life of a rotten potato.


We will be sharing writing from students at Bowral Public School over the next few days. If you’d like to send us YOUR book review, story, poem or artwork, check out our submission guidelines

Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young writers in action: Back to School

BACK TO SCHOOL
by Liora, 9, Manhattan, USA

Close up on an open notebook with words highlighted. Photo courtesy of pexels.com

Oh no, the summer is over, it’s time to go back to our schools
There is so much homework and so many rules!

You have to go shopping for school supplies
When you’d rather be eating a hamburger and fries

You’ll have PE, reading, science, math and more
And you mumble to yourself that this is quite a bore

But at least, you’ll see all your friends again
And for that I would give away my lucky pen.


You can read more of Liora’s poetry hereTo send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines.

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young writers in Action: Stars in the Sky

STARS IN THE SKY

by Gabriella, 9, Virginia USA

A hand with palm up towards a crescent moon and stars in a pale evening sky. Photo courtesy of pexels.comStars shining,
brightly,
light up the night, like
little lanterns.
.
Stars shining at night,
stars shining in space,
stars shining all day, but only
to see at night.
.
Red, blue, yellowish white,
all of these stars I like.
Spring is when I go outside,
stare and find the constellations that
light up the deep blue sky.
.
Little Dipper,
Big Dipper,
Orion’s Belt,
happy memories light up the night.
.
Stars, constellations,
little lanterns,
shine brightly,
never fading away.
.
When Zeus placed them in the sky, they were meant to stay.
.
Stars are lanterns.
Stars are motorcycles
riding slowly across the deep blue sky.
.
Every time a star dies,
a new one is born.
.
Stars are powerful.
We are powerful.
.
We are stars,
shining brightly, all over the deep, blue sky.
We are the little lanterns lighting up the sky.
We are the motorcycles riding across the sky
at night.
.
All stars are variable,
we are all variable.
We can be ourselves, able to change, able to live our own lives,
capable.
.
So, be you.
Be your own star.
Be your own little lantern.
Be your own motorcycle.
Be your own happy light.
Be the star you were
meant to be.

This is Gabriella’s first poem published by Alphabet Soup. To send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines.
Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: My Coonawarra Farm Resort Camp Experience

My Coonawarra Farm Resort Camp Experience (May 2019)
by Jessie, 11, VIC

This was my first camp experience and I will never forget it!
The lead up to camp made me both excited and a little bit nervous. I got to buy some new items for camp, which was great and our teddies were also invited to come. I brought my pink bear, who wore her handmade colourful scarf and my friends brought their stuffed toys too.

It was a cold start to our first day, but only the adults noticed that. The kids were all too excited to care and just wanted to get on the bus and go. The weather soon warmed up and the bus trip there and back was heaps of fun and we stopped for lunch at a park. I was very lucky to get to sit with Sarah on the way up, who was my designated bus buddy and then on the way back I got to sit in the prestigious back row with Bianca, Milly and Emma. On the bus there was lots of talking, laughing and singing and on the way back many of the boys sang ‘Let It Go’, redefining how NOT to sing in tune and why not everyone should try to reach the high notes.

The camp I went to (Coonawarra Farm Resort) is located in East Gippsland on approximately 140 ha. It is surrounded by bush, with a huge lake and beautiful views and home to a variety of wildlife, including kangaroos.

Our rooms were terrific, warm and had bunk beds. I shared a room with Milly, Emma, Sarah, Jemima and Lila. We all took turns getting the top bunks, as they were the most sought-after location, with the best views. We had a lot of crazy fun in our rooms including singing, dancing and way too much laughing and not a lot of sleeping.

The food was great, all cooked and prepared for us and the only jobs the kids had to do was help with setting the tables. The only thing that I didn’t really like about camp was that I couldn’t get the shower water temperature as warm as I liked.

We got to do lots of activities such as red faces, trivia night, movie night, night walk, high ropes, hut building, rock climbing, damper making, visiting Den of Nargun, etc, but my favourites were horse riding, the flying fox and the big swing.

I got to go horse riding in a large group, luckily which included my friends Emma, Bianca and Sarah. My horse was called Buzz. He was white and patchy and was a really nice, calm horse. The only thing is that he did those things no one wants to talk about, as he walked along, not even trying to wait until he got back to the paddock.

The Big Swing, what a rush! The adrenaline you get just as you pull the rope was great. Your life flashes before your eyes. Then you just have to do it again and again. I chose the very top level both times, but I would have gone even higher if I could and I could have done it all day.

The Flying Fox was so much fun, though the hill we had to walk up to get there was very steep. The Flying Fox was very high, with incredible views and you could hear the air rushing past as you travelled along the line.

Archery was another of our activities. I didn’t find it that much fun, as the target just kept moving and the ground kept jumping in front of my arrow. I think Mrs Harvey had the same problem.

In groups we all had to attempt to make waterproof huts out of branches, logs, bark etc. Then the adults got to throw large buckets of water over the huts, drenching us. Mr Bennett seemed a little bit too happy doing this job. He had a big smile on his face seeing us all wet and listening to us scream. We then got to warm ourselves by the fire and make and eat damper. The damper had the best fruit in it, that made it especially yummy.

I will also give a special mention and thank you to Monty, who we met while building our huts. Only a small group of kids will know who I’m talking about, but he was very special to us and though only with us for a short time, he touched our lives, gave us a huge amount of laughter and will forever be in our hearts.

We also went on a trip to Den Of Nargun which was the best. I really enjoyed the aboriginal stories and the beautiful views on the way.

Overall I think this was a terrific camp.  I had the best fun, I got to have so many new experiences and I left with fantastic memories that will last a lifetime.

 


Jessie has had work published at Alphabet Soup previously. You can read her book review here. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!
Posted in poetry, Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: Mamie

MAMIE
by Liora, 9, Manhattan, USA

This woman is nice
This woman is respectful
This woman likes rice
This woman is grateful

This woman is funny
This woman is fancy
This woman is as sweet as honey
This woman likes coffee

This woman likes children
This woman gives to the poor
This woman eats lemon
This woman likes to bring me to the store

This woman is my grandmother
This woman has two brothers
I hope she likes to sip coffee in a cafe
Wishing her a very happy Mother’s Day!Photo of coffee and flowers by Ylanite Koppens via pexels.com


You can read more of Liora’s poetry here. To send us YOUR story, poem, artwork or book review, check out our submission guidelines.

 

Posted in Young Writers in Action

Young Writers in Action: Warmth of my Life

WARMTH OF MY LIFE
by Anishka, 9, QLD

I know you do the washing up every night.
And clean up all my mess.
You always make us happy,
And still find time to stress.

Thank you for your hugs,
And teaching me how to keep in touch
Even though I never thanked you
I love you very much.

You are so hardworking
Today it’s your special day
We’ll give you whatever you want
On the twelfth of glorious May

I’ll answer all your work emails
And order 50 pizzas from the pizza store
Because I know you like them
I also know you like little cute boars.

You’re the one special mother
Who gets all these gifts from me
Because I am thankful
I might make you some tea.

The tulips in our garden
Do not grow without sunlight
You are their sunshine,
Without you it would be always night.

The honey in the bees’ hive
Wouldn’t be there without you,
For you, gave them loads of flowers
And  a nice sunny area too.

You might be a university student,
Or work for a company of book covers
But there is something you will always be
My happy, loving mother.

One more word for you mum,
There goes another Mother’s day
But remember one thing
I will always love you in every way.

A garden bed of multicoloured tulips.

 


Anishka is a regular contributor to Alphabet Soup. You can read her earlier work here.