Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (27 April)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, we are sharing some first lines from books on our bookshelves. So, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re posting a fabulous first line here on Soup Blog.

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

One afternoon … a princess and her panther crossed the desert sand.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it right at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is The Princess and her Panther by Wendy Orr, illustrated by Lauren Stringer
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (20 April)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, we are sharing some first lines from books on our bookshelves. So, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re posting a fabulous first line here on Soup Blog.

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

“When will they be here?’ asked Ramona Quimby, who was supposed to be dusting the living room but instead was twirling around trying to make herself dizzy.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it right at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is Ramona and her Mother by Beverly Cleary
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (13 April)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re sharing some first lines from books on our bookshelves.

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

It was Mrs May who first told me about them.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it right at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is The Borrowers by Mary Norton
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (6 April)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, we thought it would be interesting to share some first lines from books on our bookshelves. So, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re posting a fabulous first line here on Soup Blog.

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

I was raised on the banks of a winter creek.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it right at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is Ned Kelly and the Green Sash by Mark Greenwood & Frané Lessac
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (30 March)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, we thought it would be interesting to share some first lines from books on our bookshelves. So, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re posting a fabulous first line here on Soup Blog.

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

Jack Gordon was up early and dressed before his parents began to stir.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it in at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …

 

 

 

 

 

The book is 68 Teeth, an Aussie Chomps book by James Moloney
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (23 March)

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, every Friday for the rest of the year we’re posting a fabulous first line here on Soup Blog. (The first lines are quoted from children’s books on our bookshelves.)

Here’s today’s Fabulous First Line*:

My Obasaan told me the story of the dragon that used to visit her at night.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (We’ll put it right at the end of this post so you can try to guess first.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is Kumiko and the Dragon by Briony Stewart.
Posted in National Year of Reading, teachers' resources

Fabulous First Line Friday (16 March)

Have you ever been hit with a wonderful story idea but when you sat down to write, you just couldn’t find a first line that would get the story flowing?

We read lots of books at the Alphabet Soup office. Lots. And we’ve noticed that we pick up some books to read before others because their first lines jump out and grab us and we want to read on and on. (The sort of books where you think ‘I’ll just look at the first page’ and you read the first line and then an hour later you hear someone calling you for dinner and you realise—OOPS—you’ve read 243 pages and you’re nearly to the end of the book … )

To celebrate the National Year of Reading, we thought it would be interesting to share some first lines from books on our bookshelves. So, every Friday for the rest of the year we’ll post a fabulous first line.

But isn’t it Friday TODAY? we hear you ask. Why, yes, it is! So here’s the very first Fabulous First Line Friday*:

It must be the longest day this winter, Grace thought, and all I’ve found are a few bits of coal and a piece of rope.

What do you think—if you opened a book and read that first line, would you want to read on?

Do you know the name of the book? (It’s at the end of this post.)

*For the purposes of Fabulous First Line Friday, we’re counting the first line as the first line of chapter 1 in any book. So if there is an introduction or an author’s note or something before chapter 1, we don’t count that bit …
The book is Our Australian Girl: Meet Grace by Sofie Laguna
Posted in competitions, info

Spring ’09 issue coming your way!

If you are a subscriber, the spring issue of Alphabet Soup should be in your letter Cover of issue 4box early next week!

Inside you will find:

  • Q&A with Mark Greenwood
  • Curiosity corner—we talk to a family about growing vegies in their garden
  • Writing tips from the Book Chook
  • Stories, poems and book reviews
  • Kids’ writing (more stories, poems, book reviews and artwork!)
  • Crossword
  • Details of our spring writing competition!

See our website for info about our writing and design-a-cover comps, and for info about how to subscribe: www.alphabetsoup.net.au.

Posted in authors, info

The Book Chook answers kids’ questions about writing

Book Chook
© Greg Mitchell

The spring 2009 issue of Alphabet Soup will be out in mid August and inside you’ll find a new writing tips column from the Book Chook!

‘But who is this Book Chook?’ we hear you ask.

The Book Chook is the secret identity of an Australian writer who loves to read, write, and dress up as a chicken. (Doesn’t everybody?) She enjoys reading great stories that make her laugh, and make her feel as if she’s right in the middle of the action.

She says: it’s exciting to join Alphabet Soup (Chicken Soup would not have been exciting at all). And I’m looking forward to chatting to kids about the craft of writing.

If you have a question about writing, email it to bookchook@alphabetsoup.net.au and your question might appear in a future  issue of Alphabet Soup!*

*If we use your question, we will only print your name, age and state/country in the magazine unless you advise us otherwise.

[Dear Readers, Just in case you’re wondering, the Book Chook is NOT ME! I do love reading, but my chicken costume hasn’t been worn in years … ~Rebecca – Alphabet Soup’s Editor.]