Posted in book reviews, Book reviews by Rebecca, teachers' resources

Book Review: The Last Viking

The Last Viking by Norman Jorgensen and illustrated James Foley. Published by Fremantle Press, ISBN 971921888106.
(A review copy of this book was sent to us by the publisher.)

"The Last Viking (cover)"Josh’s pop is always talking about ‘exciting stuff like Vikings, and Spitfires and Redcoats, though not usually when Nan’s around.’ Josh is staying with Nan and Pop for the holidays and that’s when he decides to become a Viking, and change his name to Knut. Although he’s not very brave, when trouble arrives, Josh summons up some Viking courage and discovers just how brave he really is.

If you don’t know anything about Vikings yet, you’ll know heaps about them by the time you finish The Last Viking. The illustrations are fun and cartoon-like and if you’re a super sleuth, you’ll notice that on some of the pages there are messages written in code—rune carvings. At the back of the book (on the endpapers) you’ll find the key to crack the code.

Keep an eye out for the ravens in the book, too. In Norse mythology they are Odin’s messengers, and in The Last Viking, they keep the Viking gods updated on Josh/Knut’s progress.

The Last Viking is an exciting adventure about courage, imagination and dealing with bullies.

Time to go a-viking!

PS Check out The Last Viking blog where the author and illustrator talk about creating The Last Viking. The blog also has Viking activities and teacher’s notes.

© June 2011 “Review of The Last Viking by Norman Jorgensen & James Foley” by Rebecca Newman (Alphabet Soup magazine)

Author:

Rebecca Newman is a children's writer and poet, and the editor of the Australian children's literary blog, Alphabet Soup. rebeccanewman.net.au.

4 thoughts on “Book Review: The Last Viking

    1. Thanks, Book Chook. I’m off to the book’s launch tonight! Apparently Viking horns and braids and ugg boots will be out in force …

  1. Thanks for the fabulous introduction to these mad Viking writers! Love their ‘making of a picture book’ blog, and excting to see the project fully realised.

    1. Isn’t it interesting to read how a picture book has changed on its path to publication. (And I like the photo on the recent post of author and illustrator charging ahead with a bunch of Vikings-in-training!)
      –Rebecca

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