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It’s spring here in Perth and it even feels spring-ish — warm days, blue skies (mostly!) and birds singing or twittering outside the windows at Alphabet Soup. A change of season (and a change of month) means it’s time to change those books stacked up by your bed. Here are some brilliant books recommended by our Top Reading team.*

You’ll find a recommended list from our Top Reading Team on the last day of every month. If you missed last month’s, don’t forget to check out the July 2015 Top Reads.

*All our Top Readers are kids aged 13 and under. No grownups allowed!

Book launch (NSW)

Come along to celebrate the launch of Bring a Duck — a new picture book by Lesley Gibbes and Sue de Gennaro.

Bring a Duck

Afternoon tea and lolly bags for the kids.

When: 1.30pm, Saturday 5th September 2015

Where: The Children’s Bookshop, 6 Hannah St, Beecroft NSW

Cost: FREE but RSVP essential

RSVP: ph 94818811 or email staff @thechildrensbookshop.com.au

REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 11, WA

Sister heart (cover)

Sister Heart by Sally Morgan, Fremantle Press, ISBN 9781925163131

A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

Sister Heart is a book about Annie — an Aboriginal girl who is suddenly taken from her parents (part of the Stolen Generation). She’s taken to a government-run school where she meets Nancy, Janey, and Janey’s brother Tim. It’s a shock for Annie and she doesn’t feel like talking.

This is a verse novel told from Annie’s point of view and it’s about finding courage in a new place.

I knew a little bit about the Stolen Generation and this book deepened my understanding because it showed the emotions of the stolen children and how they coped. This is a serious and engaging read, it’s emotional and you feel everything that the characters feel.

I’d recommend this to readers aged 10 to 13.

Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of The Invention of Hugo Cabret. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

‘Tis the season for book launches (and we do love a book launch!). Check these out if you live in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, or Queensland …

VICTORIA

My name is Lizzie Flynn — A Story of the Rajah Quilt by Claire Saxby and Lizzy Newcomb

My Name is Lizzie Flynn (cover)

Come along to the launch of My Name is Lizzie Flynn — A Story of the Rajah Quilt.

When: 6.30pm until 8pm, Wednesday 19 August 2015.

Where: The Gallery, Williamstown Library, 104 Ferguson Street, Williamstown, Victoria.

RSVP: Bookings by phoning 1300 HOB LIB


 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Bob the Railway Dog by Corrine Fenton and Andrew McLean.

Bob the railway dog (cover)

Come along to the SA launch of Bob the Railway Dog by Corinne Fenton and Andrew McLean.

When: 2pm, Sunday 23 August 2015.

Where: National Railway Museum, 76 Lipson St, Port Adelaide, SA.

RSVP for catering: corinneking @bigpond.com


 

TASMANIA

Underneath a Cow by Carol Ann Martin and Ben Wood.

Underneath a Cow (cover)

Come along to the launch of Underneath a Cow by Carol Ann Martin and Ben Wood — afternoon tea, storytelling, craft, music. Children especially welcome!

When: 2pm Sunday 23 August 2015.

Where: The Southern Swan, 12 Mary St, Cygnet, Tasmania.

RSVP: no need to RSVP, just go along!


 

QUEENSLAND

Fearless with Dad by Cori Brooke and Giuseppe Poli

Fearless with Dad (cover)

Come along to the launch of Fearless with Dad by Cori Brooke and Giuseppe Poli.

When: 2pm, Saturday 29 August 2015.

Where: Where the Wild Things Are, 191 Boundary St, West End, QLD.

RSVP: events @avidreader.com.au


Why go to a book launch? Here are ten reasons why you should!

With the school holidays behind us, it’s a great time to find out what our Top Readers were reading during July. If you’re looking for a great read — here’s a pile of books for your bedside, recommended by Australian kids!

You’ll find a recommended list from our Top Reading Team on the last day of every month. If you missed last month’s, don’t forget to check out the June 2015 Top Reads.

*All our Top Readers are kids aged 13 and under. No grownups allowed!

REVIEWED BY JOSEPH, 11, WA

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick, Scholastic Press, ISBN 9780439813785

Joseph borrowed a copy of this book from his local library.

Hugo is an orphan and his job is to check that all the clocks in the Paris station are the correct time. It was really his uncle’s job — Hugo can’t show his face to anyone official (like the station inspector) because then they’ll realise his uncle is gone and send Hugo to an orphanage. His uncle’s uncashed cheques are no good because Hugo can’t cash them. One day he finds an automaton his father was working on before he died. When his father’s notebook (the only thing Hugo has left to remind him of his father) is taken away, he relies on a girl called Isabel to get it back.

Will the automaton write him a message that will solve his problems?

This book has words and pictures. It’s a combination of graphic novel and a regular novel and it means you are satisfied that you read about 520 pages, when 284 pages were text-free!

It’s definitely worth reading. It has an original idea and the setting is not something I’d come across in everyday life.

I’d recommend this book to readers aged 9 and over, particularly kids who are fascinated by machinery. I give it five stars.

Joseph is one of our regular book reviewers. His most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of On Track. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

REVIEWED BY MATILDA, 9, WA

Molly and Pim and the millions of stars (cover)

Molly and Pim and the Millions of Stars by Martine Murray, Text Publishing, ISBN 9781925240085

A review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.

This is a story about working together and going and going at it and not stopping. I liked how it’s a book about magic. Molly and a boy called Pim are trying to fix the shocking accident that happens to Molly’s Mama early in the book. (Before he starts helping, Molly thinks that Pim is weird because he does all this weird stuff at school.)

The cover looked kind of gentle with the hat and the girl and the dog and I liked how they used glittery bits for the stars. But I didn’t think the title was the best title for this book. I would have called it ‘Molly and Pim and the Mama Tree’.

I liked how this book made me laugh out loud and how it was short and sharp. My favourite character is Prudence Grimshaw. She’s mean and she’s a really picky lady. I can really imagine her voice in my head as I read.

Girls from ages 9 to 11 would enjoy this book most.

Matilda is one of our regular book reviewers. Her most recent review (if you don’t count this one) was of  Summer in Enchantia. If YOU would like to send us a book review, check out our submission guidelines. Happy reading!

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