Posted in authors, interviews

Cristy Burne and Fiona Wood: Inventor of Spray-on Skin

Cristy BurneMEET THE AUTHOR

Cristy Burne writes fiction and nonfiction and her books are bursting with adventure, friendship, family, nature, science and technology. Cristy has worked as a science communicator for nearly 20 years across six countries. She has been a science circus performer, garbage analyst, museum writer, and atom-smashing reporter at CERN, but her all-time favourite job is working with kids to embrace the intersection between science, technology and creativity.

Cristy’s latest book is the first book in the new Aussie STEM Stars series – Fiona Wood: Inventor of spray-on skin. 

Fiona Wood Inventor of Spray-On Skin by Cristy Burne

From the publisher:

With her invention of the revolutionary spray-on skin, Fiona Wood changed the way burns were treated forever. 

Fiona’s story is one of hard work and hope, of vision and direction, of stepping up, not giving in, and helping people rebuild their bodies and their lives.

Now – on with some questions about the book!


You’re a science writer, children’s author and presenter. Do you have a favourite subject area when it comes to Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths (STEM)?
My favourite part of STEM is creativity. Every single scientific breakthrough or invention or innovation ever in the whole history of the planet is the direct result of creativity. Our world is a better place because someone imagined a solution to a problem, because someone dared to dream of a new way. So being a scientist is all about being creative.

And science is all about making a difference in our world… solving mysteries, discovering knowledge, inventing fresh ways of doing things. It’s EXCITING, and we can all be part of it.

Your latest book is part of Aussie STEM Stars – a new series for kids celebrating Australia’s experts in Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths. How did you come to write about Fiona Wood?
I was very lucky to be asked to write this book about Fiona Wood, which is just an incredible honour.

I’d interacted with Fiona twice before: I’d seen her speak at a conference and LOVED her energy and passion immediately. Years later, I contacted her for an article I was writing for Double Helix magazine about The Great Unknown … I wanted to know what Fiona’s ‘Great Unknown’ was. I didn’t expect someone as busy as Fiona to answer, but she did, and once again I was overwhelmed by how generous she is, and how much good she does for the world. (She said she had many ‘Great Unknowns’ and finding answers to her questions is what drives her every day.)

So the chance to work with Fiona, to learn more about her, to share her incredible story with the world … it was one I just couldn’t pass up. I’m still pinching myself.

If I could have chosen any living scientist to write about, I would have chosen Fiona Wood. It’s such a huge responsibility to write someone else’s life. I totally recommend that you read this book … and your parents too. And your grandparents. And your teacher. I want to shout FIONA IS AMAZING to the rooftops.

How did you go about your research for writing the book?
I started by trawling the internet for all the pre-existing interviews, videos, articles and book chapters that featured Fiona. I listened to hours of radio, watched loads of YouTube, ordered books featuring great Australians, and read everything I could get my hands on.

I had 15,000 words of research before I started writing a thing. Fiona is SO busy doing incredibly vital research and life-changing work, I didn’t want to waste a minute of her time by asking questions she’d already answered in a zillion other interviews.

Also, because I had prepared, when it came time to chat with Fiona, I could focus on more personal questions, or ask about details I needed to bring a particular story to life. I then divided and ordered all that research chronologically and thematically to see if any story structure naturally appeared.

Do you have one tip for kids who’d like to write nonfiction?
Writing non-fiction is incredibly fun! Find something you’re interested in, and learn as much as you can about it. What a great job! My big tip is: don’t be afraid to ring or email someone to ask them for information or an interview. Getting your facts directly from an expert adds so much to your work. And most people, even busy people, are happy to help. (And most scientists, even busy scientists, are passionate about their work, so they love to share it!)

What’s your next writing project? 
I’m putting the finishing touches on a chapter book adventure called Beneath The Trees, which is based on the true story of an epically awful hike my family and I did in the Queensland rainforest … it was an incredible adventure, complete with blood and tears and mud and really cute platypus. Perfect for reading while cuddled in bed!

Fiona Stanley: Inventor of spray-on skin is out now! Ask for it at your nearest bookshop or library. 


Fiona Wood Inventor of Spray-On Skin by Cristy BurneAWESOME EXTRAS:

Click here to download Teacher’s Notes for the book. 

Visit Cristy Burne’s website for more about her, her books and presentations.

Hear Cristy Burne read an excerpt from the book.

Read an earlier interview with Cristy Burne 

Author:

This post was added by Rebecca Newman. Rebecca is a children's writer and poet, and the editor of the Australian children's literary blog, Alphabet Soup. For more about Rebecca visit: rebeccanewman.net.au.

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